Radio Plays

Fíodhna’s airs can be heard on radio, including:

  • Irish Waves Radio Programme, WFCF Radio 88.5 FM, Florida, USA:  http://www.flagler.edu/flaglernet/
  • ‘Chemins de Terre’ programme on Radio-Rennes, Brittany, France (100.8, Rennes) and Radio Evasion (98.7 in “pays de Broceliande” and 95.2 in “pays de Mené”: www.cheminsdeterre.com
  • WDR, Cologne, DLF and Radio Duisburg, Germany
  • RTE Radio na Gaeltachta, Ireland: ‘An Saol Ó Dheas’ le Helen Ní Shé; ‘Togha agus Rogha’ le Mairtín Tom Sheáinín;Béal Maidine’ le Neansaí Ní Choisdealbha agus Áine Hensey.
  • ‘Lift the Latch’,Connemara Community Radio with Michael O’Neill and Helen King
  • Tipperary Midwest Radio with Donnchacha Ó Chinnéide
  • Clare FM with Eoin O’Neill

 

Irish Music Magazine Reviews ‘Air Time’

immFIODHNA GARDINER
Air Time
Own Label
11 Tracks, 42 Minutes
www.fiodhnagardiner.com
There’s been a rush of albums devoted to slow airs lately – maybe as many as three, which probably equals the number released in the thirty years between 1970 and 2000. So we’re not overloaded with them yet, and Air Time is a fine addition to this category. Fiodhna Gardiner is a low whistle specialist, and as the daughter of famed Clare accordionist Bobby Gardiner she’s able to enlist an impressive band to fill out this debut CD.

Recently returned to County Clare after many years as an emigrant in Abu Dhabi, Fiodhna has built upon her experience of playing Irish music in the United Arab Emirates to produce this collection of airs ancient and modern, Irish and Scottish, with some well known melodies and some new favourites. The traditional An Raibh Tú ag an gCarraig sets the scene, with accompaniment from Gary O’Bhrian and Seamie O’Dowd. Easter Snow, a favourite air for me, adds Bobby Gardiner on accordion in a beautifully slow interpretation. Whistle and accordion alternate, and then combine for a final duet. Amhrán na Leabhar is also from the heart of the Irish tradition, a tragic tale played with great feeling here.
There’s lovely tone from Fiodhna’s Colin Goldie whistles – in A and Bb instead of the usual low D. Fiodhna’s ornamentation is peculiar to the whistle, rather than pipes or flute: tonguing and glissando, simple doublings and subtle vibrato, giving a very modern folky sound. This is enhanced by the use of keyboard, string arrangements, and harpsichord on several tracks.

Additional touches come from Mairtín O’ Connor and Liam Kelly on accordion and flute. The Dervish connection is clearest in three vocal contributions by Cathy Jordan: The Mall of Lismore, The Banks of Sullane and the traditional An Buachaillín Donn with English lyrics. Other instrumental tracks include the great Scott Skinner air Hector the Hero, recorded by several Irish musicians previously, and three Gardiner family compositions. Fiodhna’s own tunes Grá Mo Chroí and The Boy from Aughdarra honour her husband and her father respectively, and both have the poignancy of many modern whistle airs. An Ghorta, written by Fiodhna’s mother Ann, is more lyrical or even pastoral, despite being a lament inspired by the famine years in Ireland. Air Time finishes on a more cheerful note, The Dreams of Old Pa Fogerty by Scottish Gael composer Ailean Nicholson, a delightfully wistful end to a charming CD.
There’s a lot more information on Fiodhna’s website, well worth a visit.
Alex Monaghan
________________________________________

Irish Music Magazine Reviews ‘Air Time’

immFIODHNA GARDINER
Air Time
Own Label
11 Tracks, 42 Minutes
www.fiodhnagardiner.com
There’s been a rush of albums devoted to slow airs lately – maybe as many as three, which probably equals the number released in the thirty years between 1970 and 2000. So we’re not overloaded with them yet, and Air Time is a fine addition to this category. Fiodhna Gardiner is a low whistle specialist, and as the daughter of famed Clare accordionist Bobby Gardiner she’s able to enlist an impressive band to fill out this debut CD.

Recently returned to County Clare after many years as an emigrant in Abu Dhabi, Fiodhna has built upon her experience of playing Irish music in the United Arab Emirates to produce this collection of airs ancient and modern, Irish and Scottish, with some well known melodies and some new favourites. The traditional An Raibh Tú ag an gCarraig sets the scene, with accompaniment from Gary O’Bhrian and Seamie O’Dowd. Easter Snow, a favourite air for me, adds Bobby Gardiner on accordion in a beautifully slow interpretation. Whistle and accordion alternate, and then combine for a final duet. Amhrán na Leabhar is also from the heart of the Irish tradition, a tragic tale played with great feeling here.
There’s lovely tone from Fiodhna’s Colin Goldie whistles – in A and Bb instead of the usual low D. Fiodhna’s ornamentation is peculiar to the whistle, rather than pipes or flute: tonguing and glissando, simple doublings and subtle vibrato, giving a very modern folky sound. This is enhanced by the use of keyboard, string arrangements, and harpsichord on several tracks.

Additional touches come from Mairtín O’ Connor and Liam Kelly on accordion and flute. The Dervish connection is clearest in three vocal contributions by Cathy Jordan: The Mall of Lismore, The Banks of Sullane and the traditional An Buachaillín Donn with English lyrics. Other instrumental tracks include the great Scott Skinner air Hector the Hero, recorded by several Irish musicians previously, and three Gardiner family compositions. Fiodhna’s own tunes Grá Mo Chroí and The Boy from Aughdarra honour her husband and her father respectively, and both have the poignancy of many modern whistle airs. An Ghorta, written by Fiodhna’s mother Ann, is more lyrical or even pastoral, despite being a lament inspired by the famine years in Ireland. Air Time finishes on a more cheerful note, The Dreams of Old Pa Fogerty by Scottish Gael composer Ailean Nicholson, a delightfully wistful end to a charming CD.
There’s a lot more information on Fiodhna’s website, well worth a visit.
Alex Monaghan
________________________________________

Folkworld reviews ‘Air Time’

folkworldThomas Keller of ‘Folkworld’ (www.folkworld.eu) reviews Fíodhna’s CD ‘Air Time’.

The low whistle is the big baby of the traditional tin whistle/pennywhistle, distinguished by its larger size, lower pitch and a more breathy, flute-like sound. Bernard Overton is credited with manufacturing the first instrument in the early 1970s, which he made for Finbar Furey. Since Riverdance the low whistle is a respected instrument in its own right, often used for the playing of slow airs due to its enthralling and emotive sound. It has found a new trailblazer in Irish low whistle player Fíodhna Gardiner-Hyland who has featured on numerous film, television and radio programmes; while living in the United Arab Emirates, Fíodhna played whistles with the group Inis Oirr (2004-2011). These days she lives in the vicinity of the twin towns Killaloe/Ballina (Co. Clare/Tipperary) and is part of the committee organizing the Kincora Traditional Music Weekend.
Her debut solo album is exclusively dedicated to Airs for the Low Whistle, both traditional Irish (“An raibh tu ar an gCarraig”, “Amhran na Leabhair”, “Easter Snow” played over the closing credits of the Irish movie “The Lord’s Burning Rain”) and (more or less) contemporary Scottish (fiddler James Scott Skinner’s “Hector the Hero”, bagpiper Ailean Nicholson’s “The Dreams of Old Pa Fogerty”) as well as newly composed airs. Fíodhna penned “Gra mo Chroi” for her husband and “The Boy from Aughdarra” for her father, the well-known acordionist Bobby Gardiner (b. 1939), who once played with the Kilfenora Céilí Band before building a musical career on his own terms. 
Fíodhna is playing her A/Bb whistles with much heart and soul. You want to lean back, close your eyes and expose yourself to the images forming in your head. Fíodhna is joined on “Air Time” by her father, and furthermore supported by the stellar cast of Seamie O’Dowd (guitar), Mairtín Ó Connor (button accordion), Garry Ó Bhriain (piano, harpsichord) and Liam Kelly (flute). A special treat is the employment of Dervish singer Cathy Jordan on three tracks, the traditional Irish “An Buachaillin Donn” (Little Brown-Haired Boy), Andy Irvine’s “The Mall of Lismore” and Sean Ó Riada’s “The Banks of Sullane”. Fíodhna and Cathy take turns, but also trail along in harmony. Simply great!

http://www.folkworld.eu/54/e/cds2.html#gard

 

 

Folkworld reviews Air Time

folkworldThomas Keller of ‘Folkworld’ (www.folkworld.eu) reviews Fíodhna’s CD ‘Air Time’.

The low whistle is the big baby of the traditional tin whistle/pennywhistle, distinguished by its larger size, lower pitch and a more breathy, flute-like sound. Bernard Overton is credited with manufacturing the first instrument in the early 1970s, which he made for Finbar Furey. Since Riverdance the low whistle is a respected instrument in its own right, often used for the playing of slow airs due to its enthralling and emotive sound. It has found a new trailblazer in Irish low whistle player Fíodhna Gardiner-Hyland who has featured on numerous film, television and radio programmes; while living in the United Arab Emirates, Fíodhna played whistles with the group Inis Oirr (2004-2011). These days she lives in the vicinity of the twin towns Killaloe/Ballina (Co. Clare/Tipperary) and is part of the committee organizing the Kincora Traditional Music Weekend.
Her debut solo album is exclusively dedicated to Airs for the Low Whistle, both traditional Irish (“An raibh tu ar an gCarraig”, “Amhran na Leabhair”, “Easter Snow” played over the closing credits of the Irish movie “The Lord’s Burning Rain”) and (more or less) contemporary Scottish (fiddler James Scott Skinner’s “Hector the Hero”, bagpiper Ailean Nicholson’s “The Dreams of Old Pa Fogerty”) as well as newly composed airs. Fíodhna penned “Gra mo Chroi” for her husband and “The Boy from Aughdarra” for her father, the well-known acordionist Bobby Gardiner (b. 1939), who once played with the Kilfenora Céilí Band before building a musical career on his own terms. 
Fíodhna is playing her A/Bb whistles with much heart and soul. You want to lean back, close your eyes and expose yourself to the images forming in your head. Fíodhna is joined on “Air Time” by her father, and furthermore supported by the stellar cast of Seamie O’Dowd (guitar), Mairtín Ó Connor (button accordion), Garry Ó Bhriain (piano, harpsichord) and Liam Kelly (flute). A special treat is the employment of Dervish singer Cathy Jordan on three tracks, the traditional Irish “An Buachaillin Donn” (Little Brown-Haired Boy), Andy Irvine’s “The Mall of Lismore” and Sean Ó Riada’s “The Banks of Sullane”. Fíodhna and Cathy take turns, but also trail along in harmony. Simply great!

http://www.folkworld.eu/54/e/cds2.html#gard

 

 

Launch of Air Time at the Willie Clancy Week

IMG_0631

IMG_0627

IMG_0623

IMG_0621miltown_shoppingstreetBríd O’Donoghue launched ‘Air Time’ at the Willie Clancy week in Miltown Malbay, Co. Clare on Sunday 6th July.

After the graveside tribute to Willie Clancy at 3pm, there were a number of launches of noted traditional Irish recordings and publications in St. Joseph’s Convent School, Spanish Point. Fíodhna was joined by her family. Here are some photos of the event.

 

Launch of Air Time in Liam O’Riain’s Ballina, Co Tipperary

IMG_4681On Saturday 7th June next from 9pm, Fiodhna will celebrate locally the launch of her debut CD, Air Time, in Liam O’ Riann’s Pub, Ballina, Co. Tipperary.

She will be accompanied by her father, Bobby Gardiner on accordion and melodeon, multi-instrumentalist, Caoimhin O Fearghail, husband, Padraig, accordionist, John Carroll and other local musicians.

invitation

Interview on Lift The Latch, Connemara Community Radio

connemara_community_radioOn Wednesday 15th January, 2014, Fiodhna’s new album ‘Air Time’ was featured on Lift the Latch, a traditional Irish Music programme presented by Michael O’Neill and Helen King on Connemara Community Radio.

Fiodhna gave an overview of the background of producing the CD, choosing airs for inclusion and selecting accompanying musicians to create the sound she imagined. She spoke about how her upbringing instilled a love of traditional music and how her time in the Middle East influenced her own playing.

Michael and Helen played two of her airs on the programme, Easter Snow with her father Bobby Gardiner and The Banks of Sullane with Cathy Jordan and Seamie O’Dowd.

Click on the audio player below to hear the airs and Fiodhna’s interview.

Hunt Museum Performance, Limerick

As part of ‘Nollaig na mBan’ celebrations on the 5th January, Fiodhna, along with traditional singer, Noirin Ni Riainn, who is based at Glenstal Abbey, performed for a large audience in the ‘Captain’s Room’ of the Hunt Museum, Limerick. Fiodhna began and ended the evening with a traditional air from her CD ‘Air Time’, while Noirin led the room into a number of round chants, along with vocal harmonies.

Air Time Launch – Village Arts’ Centre, Kilworth

On Saturday 14th December, Fiodhna’s debut album, ‘Air Time’, was launched at The Village Arts’  Centre, Kilworth by Roy Galvin. Fiodhna was joined in concert by Eileen O’Brien on fiddle, Jack Talty on concertina and piano and her father Bobby Gardiner on accordion and melodeon. Fiodhna played 3 airs that feature on her album and was accompanied on keyboard by her husband, Padraig.

Here are some photos from the event.

Air Time Launch in The Local, Dungarvan

On Saturday 7th December, Fíodhna’s debut album, ‘Air Time‘, was launched in The Local, Dungarvan, by Co. Waterford traditional singer Ann Mulqueen. Fíodhna performed two airs from her album, ‘An Raibh tú ar an gCarraig’ and ‘Grá mo Chroí’ and was accompanied by her husband, Pádraig on keyboard. Other musicians that played included Donnchadh Gough, Brendan Clancy, Kelley Gardiner and Stephen Tutty.

Here are photos from the event.

Here is a short video from the event.


Air Time Review – Joanie Madden

joanie“Fíodhna Gardiner-Hyland is the daughter of legendary accordion player Bobby Gardiner, and as they say – the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree. This album is a beautiful collection of slow airs and songs played with great heart and feeling, featuring Fíodhna on the whistle with a backdrop of luscious arrangements provided by some of Irelands leading musicians, including Seamie O’Dowd, Martin O’Connor, Bobby Gardiner, Gary Ó Bhroinn, Liam Kelly and Cathy Jordan featured on three songs. I certainly enjoyed listening to this album and know you will too.”
(Joanie Madden, Cherish The Ladies)

Air Time Review – Aodan O’Dubhghaill

When Fíodhna sent me a review copy of her new “Air Time” album in March 2013, I was delighted to be asked to write a review for her. Only a few short weeks earlier, I heard Fíodhna play a beautiful arrangement of “An Raibh tú ag an gCarraig” at a session run by Paul Smyth in Liam Ó Riains, Ballina/Killaloe, Co. Tipperary.
From the first notes of “An Raibh tú…” this album had me engrossed. Because all the airs are played on low whistles, they move seamlessly in and out of one another. You would imagine that a brave undertaking like this – to play only airs for 40 minutes plus – would lead to fatigue. But I can guarantee the listener that this is not the case, as each air has been arranged and accompanied with such care and attention to detail, that even on repeated listening, the music is given different interpretations as to hold the attention.
There are surprises too. Cathy Jordan’s singing on three of the tracks caught me by surprise. On “An Buachaillín Donn” she is introduced by the whistle but then, after she sings a verse the whistle takes the melody again to the harmonies of voice. Likewise, Martín Ó Connor’s use of the box on “Amhrán na Leabhar” is most interesting and enhancing to Fíodhna’s playing. Seamie O’Dowd’s laid back fingered guitar, strings and keyboard enhance the newly composed air “The Boy from Aughdarra” which flows into Fíodhna’s mother’s composition “An Ghorta” which evokes visions of recent famine in Africa as well as events in our own country in the 1840’s.
Cathy’s harmonies with guitar, accompany the whistle again on the opening of the well know song “The Banks of Sullane” and by the end of the song the whistle and voice are in perfect unison together.
“Hector the Hero” is an air I first heard the great Scottish fiddler Aly Bain play many years ago and it was written by another great fiddler Scott Skinner for his friend, Sir Hector Macdonald who committed suicide as a result of unsavoury rumours and illness. How apt that it should be included here when we hear about so much of such tragedies happening, particularly among the young, in the Ireland of today.
“The Dreams of old Pa Fogerty” is the other Scottish air on the album and again with Mairtín’s drone-like box playing and fills, finishes the music off nicely with Gary Ó Bhroinn’s piano.
aodanOne track I hadn’t mentioned earlier ‘’Easter Snow’’ is an air I first heard played by the legendary Séamus Ennis (piper and collector) and one that he also named his final home in Naul, Co. Dublin after. There are many different descriptions of where the air originates but perhaps my favourite is that Easter Snow is a reference to the blackthorn blossom which appears in the Springtime; blackthorn is the opposite to hawthorn in that it bears its blossom before its leaves open, and the blossom time is usually quite close to Eastertide. Fíodhna is joined here by her father, the well-known Button Accordion player Bobby Gardiner for a beautiful rendition of the tune. So, on this album which is firmly based in the tradition, we hear her mother’s and father’s influences. As the old sean-fhocal goes: briseann an dúchas trí shúile an chait (heritage breaks out through the eyes of the cat).
(Aodan O’Dubhghaill, Head of Lyric FM)

Agalamh ar ‘An Saol Ó Dheas’ le Helen Ní Shé

saolAgalamh idir Fíodhna Ní Ghairnéir agus Helen Ni Shé faoi dlúthdhiosca nua, den teideal AIR TIME – Airs for the Low , á sheoladh sa Seomra Caidrimh i gColáiste Mhuire Gan Smál, Luimneach ar an 5ú Mí na Nollag.

Cliceáil anseo chun éisteacht le h-agallamh a dhein Fiodhna ar an gclár An Saol ó Dheas ar 02/12/13 ar Raidió na Gaeltachta.

Seoladh i gColáiste Mhuire gan Smál, Luimneach, 5ú Mí na Nollag

micTugtar cuireadh duit a bheith i láthair ar an Déardaoin 5 Mí na Nollag 2013 @ 1.10i.n. sa Seomra Caidrimh nuair a sheolfar dlúthdhiosca nua ó Fhíodhna Gardiner, den teideal

AIR TIME – Airs for the Low Whistle.

You are cordially invited to the launch of the new CD from Fíodhna Gardiner, entitled AIR TIME – Airs for the Low Whistlein An Seomra Caidrimh on Thursday 5 December @ 1.10pm.

Cuirfear sólaistí ar fáil/Refreshments will be provided

Fáilte roimh chách

Air Time Review – Peter Browne

peter“It is a pleasure to hear this ample collection of slow airs, so well arranged and played and with such variety of sound. The slow air has a great capacity for musical expression and Fíodhna and her fellow musicians and family are to be congratulated on giving fresh life to these old and beautiful airs”.
(Peter Browne, Producer, RTÉ Radio 1, Ceilí House Programme)